An Album a Day: Invasion of Privacy

February 1,  Invasion of Privacy – Cardi B

Genre: Rap
Year: 2018
Runtime: 48:13
Total tracks: 13
Songs you might know:
– “Drip” (ft. Migos)
– “Bodak Yellow”
– “Be Careful”
– “I Like It” (ft. Bad Bunny and J Balvin)
– “Ring” (ft. Kehlani)
– “Bartier Cardi” (ft. 21 Savage)

 

My prior relationship with this album: Cardi B is one of those people that is more famous for her public persona than her actual music. That is to say that while I was aware of the fact that Cardi B seemed to be feuding with Nicki Minaj, that she had a baby with Offset, and that she once said “hoes don’t get cold,” I really hadn’t heard much of this album beyond “Bodak Yellow” and “Drip.” However because Cardi’s reputation proceeds her, it didn’t really feel like an album I hadn’t heard either.

My impressions this time around: Look, I am the first to admit that this genre is not my wheelhouse. I don’t listen to rap. However, from what I can tell this is a well-executed version of it. I appreciate how Invasion of Privacy draws from different musical influences, and there’s also emotional variety. And I say that as someone who at one point would’ve said all rap sounds the same, largely because I had never taken the time to listen to a full album of it. Here we get more empowering tracks like “Get Up 10” (which might be my favorite) juxtaposed with more vulnerable, melancholy tracks like “Thru Your Phone.”

All that being said, this isn’t a rap album that’s going to appeal to people who don’t typically go for rap (not that it’s intended to be). While I did appreciate some of the more subdued songs that showed me a different side of Cardi, I can’t say that this is an album I see myself playing in the future. Not because it’s bad, but because it’s just doesn’t align with my personal tastes.

Who would enjoy it? Honestly I think most people have already made up their minds about Cardi B whether they’ve listened to this album or not. I’d say it’s a solid album and especially good for people who want more female-centric narratives in their rap music.

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